Aid for Education

Education is the most powerful antidote against poverty in Africa, as quoted by Irina Bokova, Director General of Organization of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). However, UNESCO warns that the lack of aid to Africa and aid for education could derail efforts to make 32 million school children to get in to the schools. Various NGOs and some volunteers have taken up this task of education for poor in Africa. It is estimated that till 2015, there will be 23 million school children in the region, still, more than one in three adults in the continent are illiterate. Africa also has some of the inequalities in the world in education, due to factors such as sex, language or residence.

Under the new education reform program 1987, the Junior Secondary Schools are aimed to impart a broad-based education in Africa, to the students, including pre-disposition to technical and vocation subjects and basic life skills which will enable them to discover their aptitudes and potentialities so and induce desire for self-improvement, and appreciate the use of both brain and hand to make them creative and self-employable. It is also ensured that all Junior Secondary Schools are day schools with mixed sexes.

Education is the most powerful antidote against poverty in Africa, as quoted by Irina Bokova, Director General of Organization of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). However, UNESCO warns that the lack of aid to Africa and aid for education could derail efforts to make 32 million school children to get in to the schools. Various NGOs and some volunteers have taken up this task of education for poor in Africa. It is estimated that till 2015, there will be 23 million school children in the region, still, more than one in three adults in the continent are illiterate. Africa also has some of the inequalities in the world in education, due to factors such as sex, language or residence.