Aid for Education

Education is the most powerful antidote against poverty in Africa, as quoted by Irina Bokova, Director General of Organization of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). However, UNESCO warns that the lack of aid to Africa and aid for education could derail efforts to make 32 million school children to get in to the schools. Various NGOs and some volunteers have taken up this task of education for poor in Africa. It is estimated that till 2015, there will be 23 million school children in the region, still, more than one in three adults in the continent are illiterate. Africa also has some of the inequalities in the world in education, due to factors such as sex, language or residence.

Under the new education reform program 1987, the Junior Secondary Schools are aimed to impart a broad-based education in Africa, to the students, including pre-disposition to technical and vocation subjects and basic life skills which will enable them to discover their aptitudes and potentialities so and induce desire for self-improvement, and appreciate the use of both brain and hand to make them creative and self-employable. It is also ensured that all Junior Secondary Schools are day schools with mixed sexes.

Education is the most powerful antidote against poverty in Africa, as quoted by Irina Bokova, Director General of Organization of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). However, UNESCO warns that the lack of aid to Africa and aid for education could derail efforts to make 32 million school children to get in to the schools. Various NGOs and some volunteers have taken up this task of education for poor in Africa. It is estimated that till 2015, there will be 23 million school children in the region, still, more than one in three adults in the continent are illiterate. Africa also has some of the inequalities in the world in education, due to factors such as sex, language or residence.

What Parents Should Know About the University of Minnesota Casual Sex Study

Some say the world has flipped on its side, leaving parents in a quandary. Long gone are the sugar-coated days of Ozzie and Harriet and their well-separated twin beds. No such sweetening of reality for today’s young people. No, sir. Now such comedies as Two and a Half Men portray casual sex as an entertaining end-goal, and ads extol the benefits of Viagra and KY Intense.

Meanwhile, “adults” can simply head to Craigslist, click on “Casual Encounters,” make a few promises, like being at least eighteen, and then connect with some stranger. No more complicated than seeking a used crib or laptop. The message nowadays is clear: nothing is taboo anymore.

It’s been an uphill battle for parents and schools for some time now, and the forecast doesn’t look promising. Despite pleas to abstain, make commitments, be responsible, and appreciate the risks-unwanted pregnancies, STDs, and HIV/AIDS–our kids continue to engage in oral and casual sex at ever younger ages. Our all-encompassing media makes no-strings-attached-sex seem so appealing. Face it: nowadays, enjoying “friends with benefits” is no longer out of the ordinary.

Previous studies, such as the one out of England’s Dunham University last year, confirmed what many of us have been thinking, and that’s that there is an emotional downside to the one-night stand. Indeed, while 80% of the surveyed men in this instance reported positive feelings afterward, only 54% of the women said so, reporting that they regretted having been “used.”

Yet now comes word out of the University of Minnesota’s Project EAT (Eating Among Teens) suggesting that young adults engaging in casual sex don’t appear to be at any more increased risk of negative effects than those in more committed relationships. Of the 1,311 sexually active 18- to 24-year-old participants-574 males and 737 females:

o 55% reported that their last sexual partner was with an exclusive partner;

o 25% said their most recent partner was a fiancé, spouse, or life partner;

o 12% said their last sexual partner was a close but not exclusive partner;

o 8% had been with a casual acquaintance.

Said lead researcher, Maria E. Eisenberg, Sc.D., M.P.H, “We were so surprised. The conventional wisdom is that casual sex, ‘friends with benefits,’ and hooking up is hurtful. That’s what we’ve been teaching kids for decades.”

For some, this study’s conclusions all but sanction such behaviors. As one Internet post reads: “But the mentality that young people’s sexuality needs to be controlled, especially young women’s sexuality, is what’s responsible for this so-called ‘conventional wisdom.’ If you haven’t been brainwashed by abstinence-only education, you can see with clear eyes that hooking up is about enjoying pleasure… Casual sex only becomes harmful when it’s stigmatized.”

Still, despite the Minnesota study’s findings and the progressive attitudes held by many, it should be noted what the researchers also found: more than twice as many males as females reported that their last sexual coupling was casual. It seems reasonable, then, to conclude that such findings underscore more than ever the need for parents to remain vigilant, advise their children to protect themselves, and be wary. Schools, too.

As Dr. Eisenberg cautions about the study, “… This should not minimize the legitimate threats to physical well-being associated with casual sexual relationships, and the need for such messages in sexuality education programs and other interventions with young adults.” The risks are very real– physically, as most agree, but emotionally, too, and parents must take note. This is, after all, just one study among countless others that contradict its conclusions.

Health Educator Jobs – Are You Interested in a Career in Health Education?

Health educators have the responsibility of encouraging individuals to live healthy lifestyles and to promote habits, which will prevent disease and other nutritional problems. They will commonly address such subjects as proper nutrition and the importance of exercise, in addition to safe sex and screening.

After assessing the needs of their clients, health education workers will then determine how best they should present the necessary information, which may be in a lecture, classroom, health screening, or video format, and they will usually promote ideas which are compatible with a government or their employers.

Health educators will then implement their plan which may require funding or grants, and after the completion of this program, they will then evaluate the success of it. In a hospital or medical care facility, they will usually work one on one with patients, educating them about their diagnoses and the steps that they should take to improve their lifestyle. These professionals will frequently help patients find resources which can help them with their illness, which can include brochures and classes, in addition to extracurricular educational programs.

In colleges and universities, they will work with students in order to prevent risk factors such as smoking, poor nutrition, and dangerous sexual activity. A health educator may also be found in secondary schools where they will teach about the dangers of alcohol and drug use, in addition to how to practice safe sex.

When working in the private sector, these individuals will create programs that will address the needs of employees in a firm, creating presentations which will fit around a worker’s schedule.

Most will work 40 hours a week, with some working on weekends and nights in order to provide public lectures to audiences regarding health and nutrition. They may also have to travel to different business work sites and colleges and other educational institutions in order to give presentations.

Most health educators will require a bachelor’s degree education although some may be able to get by with an associates degree. These professionals hold about 62,000 jobs in America, with 20% working for state and local governments. Employment should grow significantly over the next 10 years as governments and businesses increasingly recognize the value of preventative health.

In 2006, the middle 50th percentile of health educators made between $31,300 and $56,580, with those working in surgical hospitals earning the highest rate of pay.